About Julie Seyler

Julie Seyler is a foodaholic, writer, and author of the blog, TwoBitTart.com. A graduate of culinary school and an itinerant student of gelato, pastry, and, most recently, Italian pasta, she labels herself neither Chef nor expert, but a chronicler of culinary vice. Follow her on Instagram: @TwoBitTart.

Rich German Chocolate Cake

A German Chocolate Cake

“Her Velcro heart unwittingly snags those, frayed and tattered, who happen to brush past.”

I wrote that almost two years ago, believing it was happenstance – this bad luck of mine that snares the ragged and unraveled hearts of the world, my misfortune of drawing unhealthy relationships to me. I’ve come to realize it’s a talent, a finely honed skill. There’s no chance involved. I possess a preternatural ability to home in on the damaged. Like a parlor trick, I’ll enter a room with 1000 men and I’m drawn to the solitary marred soul like a magnet. Shit, I don’t even require a room…let me peruse an array of dating site photos and, like an eyewitness, I’m pulled towards the one incapable of connection – “Officer, that’s your man right there!” It would be a neat talent, if it weren’t my heart on the line.

Which leads me to another quote…this one is not from me, but she could easily be speaking to me.

“You’re not a woman of convention or you wouldn’t be here, but you like to pretend you are so people don’t notice you. But you sometimes like that as well, and can dress to draw the eye. But then you think the men who look at you are fools, or worse, to be taken in by such an obvious outward show. So, instead you’re drawn to dark, complicated, impossible men, assuring your own unhappiness and isolation because, after all, you’re happiest alone.”

“…dark, complicated, impossible men” – check, check, double-check.

By this time, you must be wondering, “Damn Julie, how in the hell are you going to tie this into a recipe?” Well, since we’re talking about hearts today, nothing speaks of affection like chocolate and, since today’s theme focuses on the heart’s darker edges, this post calls for a dark, bittersweet version of a typically conventional confection. Enjoy!


Rich German Chocolate Cake

  • Servings: 12-14 slices
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The darkest, richest German Chocolate Cake you’ll ever find.


Ingredients

    Filling
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 3 large egg yolks
  • ½ cup unsalted butter
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 ½ cups pecans, toasted and finely chopped
  • 2 ½ cups sweetened shredded coconut, toasted
  • Chocolate Frosting
  • 10 ounces semisweet chocolate pieces
  • 3 Tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 Tablespoons light corn syrup
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • Cake
  • 2 ¼ cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon instant coffee granules
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups cold water
  • ⅔ cup canola oil
  • 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 2 teaspoons white vinegar

Directions

  1. Make the Coconut-Pecan Filling: In a medium saucepan, combine the cream, sugar, and yolks. In a large bowl, combine the butter salt, toasted pecans and toasted coconut.
  2. Heat the cream mixture, stirring constantly, until it begins to thicken and reaches 170 degrees F. Immediately pour over the pecan-coconut mixture and stir until butter melts. Cool to room temperature (mixture will thicken).
  3. Make the Chocolate Frosting: Place chocolate in a bowl with corn syrup. Heat heavy whipping cream until just beginning to boil. Pour over chocolate, let stand one minute and then stir until smooth. Cool to room temperature. Beat for 2-3 minutes to lighten and whip to spreading consistency.
  4. Make the Cake: Preheat oven to 350⁰ F. Line three 8” cake pans with parchment paper and lightly butter paper.
  5. Sift together flour, sugar, cocoa powder, baking soda and salt. Combine water, oil, vanilla extract and white vinegar. Slowly whisk wet ingredients into dry ingredients. The batter will be wet.
  6. Pour the batter into the prepared pans and bake for 20 minutes or until a tester inserted in the center of the cake comes out clean. Cool in the pans for 10 minutes, then invert onto a wire rack to cool completely.
  7. To assemble, place the first layer on a cake plate. Spread with one-third of the pecan-coconut mixture. Continue layering the cake finishing with a layer of the pecan-coconut mixture on top. Frost the sides of the cake with the chocolate frosting and pipe a decorative border around the pecan-coconut mixture on top.

German Chocolate & Me

Best Coffee Cake Muffins

These muffins have the ideal 50/50 ratio of streusel to cake that every proper coffee cake should have – and the muffin portion is so light, rather than eat the streusel and throw away the muffin– it begs you to eat the whole thing…and perhaps even go for another. No health–redeeming qualities – this is pure morning indulgence.

coffe cake muffins with streusel topping

“Good morning, Sunshine,” the dawn nudges me through my bedroom window. I roll to my left, away from the light, and burrow deeper under the duvet, hoping the patiently waiting kitties outside my bedroom door haven’t heard me stir. I’ve made this bed too much of a sanctuary to leave these sweet dreams and warm warren of covers so easily. I sleep in a freezing-cold room, a habit I learned from my mother. Each evening, I throw my window wide open to the night air, and if the eve isn’t cold enough, I supplement with A/C as well. Sixty-seven degrees – ideal sleeping conditions for coveting a deeper snuggle, but not a temperature that beckons throwing the covers off each morning. I wear nothing but a tank top and panties, ensuring the need for my well-insulated nest. I surround myself with no less than four pillows – two under my head, one that I drape myself over, like a lover, and a fourth on standby, in case one escapes to the floor during the night. My blanket is “microplush,” my duvet, goose down. I arrange myself beneath the warmth and weight of these friends, creating a womb for dreaming, and dread the morning that always seems to come too soon.

A steaming cup of coffee brought to me in bed, with just the right amount of milk – my favorite morning treat, but not a pleasure I’ve experienced lately. If I want coffee, it’s up to me to leave this nest and brew it. Caffeine alone will not tempt me from my lair, but coffee and one of these muffins does the trick.


Best Coffee Cake Muffins

  • Servings: 12 muffins
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These muffins have the ideal 50/50 ratio of streusel to cake that every proper coffee cake should have – and the muffin portion is so light, rather than eat the streusel and throw away the muffin– it begs you to eat the whole thing.


Ingredients

    Crumb topping
  • ½ cup (packed) dark brown sugar
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • Batter
  • 1 ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 6 Tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • 1 large eggs
  • ⅔ cups full-fat plain yogurt
  • ½ teaspoon lemon zest
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions

  1. Make crumb topping: Mix both sugars, cinnamon, and salt in medium bowl. Add melted butter and stir to blend. Add flour and toss until clumps form. Set aside.
  2. Make Muffins: Preheat oven to 350°F. Line 12 muffin tins with papers or grease with butter. Sift flour, baking soda, and salt into medium bowl and set aside. In the bowl of a mixer, beat butter until smooth. Add sugar and beat until light and fluffy. Add egg and beat until well combined. Add yogurt, lemon zest and vanilla and beat until blended. Add flour mixture in 2 additions, beating just until incorporated.
  3. Fill each muffin tin ¼ full of batter. Sprinkle ½ of crumb topping over. Cover topping with remaining batter, smoothing as evenly as possible. Cover with a thick layer of remaining topping. Do not overfill.
  4. Bake muffins until tester inserted into center comes out clean and topping is deep golden brown and slightly crisp, about 25 minutes. Cool and serve slightly warm or at room temperature.

Faux Pho Soup

Meaty beef short ribs and beef shank ensure a rich broth, the star of this Pho Soup. Simmering cinnamon and star anise ensure a wonderfully scented house.

A bowl of Pho Soup garnished with mint, cilantro and lime
…the season of suicide and divorce and prickly dread, wherever the wind blows.”
                                                         – Joan Didion, Slouching Toward Bethlehem

No riot of color or chilling air, October’s subtlety in LA is lost to anyone not labeled “native.” Feigning Hollywood starlet ennui, tanned summer leaves serenely suicide from weary trees, “Too hot,” they lament, “I cannot stay a moment longer.” Stifling Santa Ana winds unfurl scents of burning sagebrush with feelings of prickly dread and stopped time. “Earthquake weather,” we proclaim. Porch lights flicker awake by 6:00 pm, lighting barefoot children pedaling bikes in dusty cul-de-sacs. LA quietly shifts into autumn, leaving paroxysms of sunset hues to the other coast.

Coincidentally, this soup popped up on my Facebook memories for today – I first made this recipe exactly seven years ago.


Faux Pho Soup

Meaty beef short ribs and beef shank ensure a rich broth in the Pho Soup. Simmering cinnamon and star anise ensure a wonderfully scented house.


Ingredients

  • 1 ½ lbs. bone-in beef short ribs
  • 1 ½ lbs. beef shank, cut into 2 or 3 pieces
  • ½ onion, sliced
  • 1-inch piece ginger, smashed
  • 1 bunch scallions, white parts smashed and greens chopped and reserved
  • 2 large garlic cloves, smashed
  • Fresh red chili or serrano chili, stemmed and halved
  • 6 cups water
  • 2 Tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 whole star anise
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 8 oz. dried flat Asian rice noodles
  • Mint sprigs, roughly torn
  • Cilantro leaves, roughly torn
  • Lime wedges
  • salt and white pepper

Directions

  1. Brown meat in batches in a large soup pot with a bit of oil. Set meat aside. Saute onion, ginger, white parts of scallions, garlic cloves, and chili until onion begins to brown.
  2. Add water, soy sauce, star anise, and cinnamon. Return meat and any accumulated juices to pot. Bring to boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 2 ½ hours.
  3. Transfer meat to cutting board. Discard bones and membrane and shred meat into small pieces.
  4. Strain broth through a sieve lined with cheese cloth and skim fat. Add meat back into broth and season with salt and white pepper.
  5. Meanwhile, cook rice noodles according to package directions. Place noodles in individual bowls, add scallion greens, torn mint springs and torn cilantro leaves. Ladle hot soup over noodles and finish with a squeeze of lime juice.

Moroccan Berber Soup

This highly-flavored soup relies on an exotic mix of spices to provide its complexity.

A bowl of Moroccan Berber Soup

Last Monday, she was surprised to discover a long weekend punctuating the end of her week. Her weekend plans were already set – big plans – plans to simmer soups and trim gangly backyard bushes; plans to kick her blogging back in gear and plans for uninterrupted hours of reading. Plans to nest and regroup, really. Once she realized the calendar was gifting her today as a bonus (Columbus Day, really?), her mind turned instead to great escapes, her grand plans easily slipping away – the simmering, the trimming, the blogging, the nesting. Her mind has been on a roller coaster of late and, even more than her kitchen, miles of asphalt between her and her problems pacify troubled thoughts. Her first idea was a hotel and mineral springs nestled in an oasis of desert palms about 90 minutes from home – tranquility and a lobotomy brought to you by three days of pruney soaks. Sadly, her budget and their rates did not align. Her next solution, further afield, was a rustic riverside cabin sheltered within a shaded grove of pines. Sold out. Disheartened, she resigned herself to stay home, with soup and bushes and blog and books, wishing to be somewhere else entirely.

Flashing back to 2009, I developed this Moroccan-inspired soup as part of my culinary school final. Unique spices like ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg and turmeric result in an exotically complex flavor that won over Chef as well as the other students.


Moroccan Berber Soup

This highly-flavored soup relies on an exotic mix of spices to provide its complexity.


Ingredients

  • ½ onion, finely chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, finely chopped
  • 2 carrots, peeled and finely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 28 oz. whole canned San Marzano tomatoes with juice, chopped
  • 6 cups chicken stock
  • 7 oz. fideo pasta (found in Hispanic section of well-stocked markets) or capellini
  • ½ cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 3 Tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
  • 3 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • Salt and freshly-ground pepper
  • Plain yogurt, for garish

Directions

  1. In a large soup pot, sauté onion, celery and carrot in a bit of oil until softened. Add the ginger, turmeric, cinnamon, nutmeg, and black pepper and sauté until fragrant. Add the chopped tomatoes with juice and chicken stock. Bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes or until carrot is soft.
  2. Add fideo pasta and simmer for 10 minutes. Add cilantro, parsley, and lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper. Garnish with plain yogurt and serve.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Salted Caramel Tart

I’ve been enjoying more than my fair share of ice cream these last few scorching days of summer – I’m up to a 3-scoop per week habit.  Some of the goodness I’ve recently been devouring inspired the flavors in this tart – chocolate, peanut butter, and salted caramel (oh my!).

A chocolate peanut butter salted caramel tart with a slice missing

“Are you a Pastry Chef?”

A simple question, and one I’ve been faced with before, yet the usual self-effacing, rambling answer once again tumbles from my lips…

“No, not really. I make my living as an event planner, although I am, technically, a classically trained, non-practicing chef…but not a pastry chef. Pastry is my passion, but I’ve never gone to Pastry School, although I’d like to eventually. Baking is a hobby.” Ramble, ramble, ramble.

Why is it so difficult for me to acknowledge my merit, embrace my abilities and just answer, “Yes. Yes I am.”

And here, my friend, is the proof.


Chocolate Peanut Butter Salted Caramel Tart

  • Servings: One 9-inch Tart
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A silky combination of dark chocolate, peanuts, and buttery salted caramel.


Ingredients

  • 10-oz package shortbread cookies, such as Lorna Doone
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 stick (½ cup) unsalted butter, melted and cooled
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 1 cup salted butter caramel, plus more for garnish (I use David Lebovitz’s version)
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • 4 oz. bittersweet chocolate, at least 60% cocoa, chopped
  • ⅓ cup (rounded) peanut butter (not natural peanut butter, which will separate)
  • ½ cup roasted salted peanuts, chopped, plus more for garnish
  • Sweetened whipped cream, for garnish

Directions

  1. Make shortbread crust: Preheat oven to 350 F. In the bowl of a food processor, pulse shortbread cookies and salt into crumbs. Add melted butter and pulse until mixture resembles wet sand. Press crumbs along bottom and up sides of a 9” tart pan. Bake for 15 minutes or until golden. Cool.
  2. Make filling: In a medium saucepan, bring heavy whipping cream and salted butter caramel to simmer – don’t boil. In a medium bowl, whisk egg yolks and then slowly whisk cream mixture into yolks, tempering to avoid curdling eggs. Return mixture to saucepan and cook over medium heat, whisking constantly until temperature registers 170 degrees. Remove from heat and whisk in chocolate and then peanut butter until melted.
  3. Sprinkle cooled crust with roasted salted peanuts. Pour filling through a sieve over peanuts. Chill, uncovered, until set, at least 2 hours. Garnish with sweetened whipped cream, drizzled caramel and peanuts. Chill until ready to serve.