Nectarine Galette

Nectarine Crostata

Did you know that the Pledge of Allegiance wasn’t written until 1892, 100 years after America became a country? It wasn’t the founding fathers who created it; it’s not in the constitution. Did you know this was the original pledge:

“I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

Notice what’s missing? It’s those two contentious words, “under god,” the source of so much brouhaha these days. Did you know those words weren’t added until 1954? 1954! President Eisenhower encouraged Congress to add those words to help undermine what he thought was a pervasive Communist threat in the US. So when the mandatory-allegiance supporters say, “it’s what the founding fathers wanted,” “it’s what our country stands for,” or “it’s tradition,” they are misinformed.

I believe children should be given the choice of reciting the pledge of allegiance in school. Childhood recitation will not define allegiance to this country as an adult. When you recited the allegiance in school , truly, was there any feeling behind it? As a child, did you understand the words? I recited it for seven years in a hazy half-sleeping monotone. Further, adults (kid’s don’t care) shouldn’t point out or ostracize any child that doesn’t choose to recite it – as long as the student sits or stand respectfully during its recitation. Teaching a child to assert their beliefs, while being respectful of other’s differing beliefs, is a more valuable lesson than daily reciting of a pledge. It’s called Tolerance and it would serve us well now.

Happy Birthday, America!

Stepping off of my soapbox now. This galette is so simple to throw together; it’s perfect for easy entertaining like a backyard bbq. It’s less fussy than a traditional pie, but does just as good of a job highlighting summer’s bounty of stone fruit. Add a dollop of whipped cream or scoop of ice cream and you’re good to go!


Nectarine Galette

  • Servings: about 8 slices
  • Print
Preheating the baking sheet and sprinkling the crust with panko ensures a flaky crust.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups sliced nectarines
  • 2 Tablespoons brown sugar
  • Zest and juice from ½ small lemon
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 ⅓ cup flour
  • 1 Tablespoon sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ⅓ cup canola oil
  • 3 Tablespoons whole milk
  • 2 Tablespoons panko breadcrumbs
  • 1 Tablespoon butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 Tablespoon sugar, preferably turbinado, such as Sugar in the Raw

Directions

  1. Preheat a sheet pan in a 375⁰ oven. In a medium bowl, combine nectarines with brown sugar, lemon zest, lemon juice and cinnamon. Toss to coat. Set nectarine mixture aside.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine flour, sugar and salt. Combine oil and milk and gently add to flour mixture. Roll crust between two sheets of parchment paper to about a 10” circle.
  3. Remove top sheet of parchment and sprinkle crust with panko breadcrumbs in a circle, leaving a 1” border. Arrange nectarine slices on crust, overlapping in concentric circles, leaving border. Fold border over nectarines. Dot nectarines with butter.
  4. Beat egg and brush over pastry border. Sprinkle border with turbinardo sugar. Place galette on parchment on preheated sheet pan. Bake at 375⁰ for 40-50 minutes or until crust is golden brown and filling is bubbly. Cool on a wire rack.

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9 thoughts on “Nectarine Galette

  1. I’m from Canada, didn’t have that reminder to love my country everyday in school and turned out I love my country! Just sayin… Oh and this galette looks fantastic, fruity with a crispy crust! Top!

    Like

  2. Love the background info you provided for the pledge of allegiance. This galette is absolutely gorgeous with the arrangement of the nectarine slices.

    Like

  3. ha, I always hated being made to say the pledge so as soon as I started learning Spanish I would only say the pledge in Spanish 🙂 This galette though! I adore stone fruits of all kinds, and this is so pretty. It really would make a great brunch addition!

    Like

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