Mushroom Bourguignon

a bowl of mushroom bourguignon with egg noodles
Sitting at my desk, my grumbling stomach turns from my work to thoughts of lunch and the leftover pork and plantain stew in my fridge. The stew is an easy answer to my hunger – a brief microwave and lunch is served, yet what I crave this minute are vegetables. I quickly realize that all I’ve eaten for the last week is a combination of meat and starch with nary a vegetable in sight. I leave the stew where it is and order a humongous Asian chicken salad from the local café instead, devouring it in about 30 seconds. This woman needs more veggies in her diet.

Some purists would argue this isn’t truly a bourguignon. After I respond with, “Thank you for your feedback” (Event planner speak for “I don’t care what you think.”), I would reply that this is my no-fail, go-to, beef bourguignon recipe, with the beef removed and the mushrooms turned up to eleven. It’s bourguignon in my book. Omit the bacon and switch out the beef broth for vegetable broth if you want to serve this dish to your vegetarian friends.

This is comfort food you can feel good about.


Mushroom Bourguignon


Ingredients

  • 3 strips thick cut bacon, diced
  • 2 lbs. Portobello mushroom caps, sliced ½” thick
  • 1 carrot, finely diced
  • 1 celery rib, finely diced
  • ½ onion, finely diced
  • 2 Tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 Tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup pinot noir
  • 1 cup beef stock
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cup frozen pearl onions, thawed.
  • Salt and pepper

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350⁰ F. Sauté bacon in a Dutch oven until crisp. Remove bacon and reserve. Sauté mushrooms in bacon drippings until beginning to soften, but not until they release all of their juice, 2-3 minutes. Remove mushrooms and reserve.
  2. Add a bit of oil to the Dutch oven and sauté carrot, celery & onion until beginning to brown. Add tomato paste and flour and sauté 1-2 minutes until flour turns golden. Add pinot noir and reduce until thickened, scraping up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Add stock, thyme sprigs, bay leaf, pearl onions, reserved bacon and reserved mushrooms with any accumulated juice. Bring to a boil, cover and transfer to oven. Braise for 30 minutes or until carrots are tender. If sauce isn’t thick enough, cook uncovered on the stovetop for an additional 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Serve over egg noodles, polenta, or rice.


a bubbling pot of mushroom bourguignon

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Farro and Pomegranate Salad

Chewy farro flecked with pomegranate seeds, feta, bacon and almonds makes a colorful and hearty main-course salad. The salty-tart flavor of preserved lemons adds a unique twist.

a bowl of farro pomegranate salad

When it comes to the latest dietary fad or junk-science eating recommendations, I’m an avowed denyer. In my humble opinion, sugar is not evil. Unless you have celiac disease or wheat sensitivity, gluten is not the devil’s work. Dairy is not the enemy and caffeine will not kill you.

When it comes to eating, I trust in the axiom, “everything in moderation, including moderation.” I believe that, holistically, it’s healthier to stop stressing about what goes in our mouth and just eat – a variety of food (I said “food” – not chemicals or genetically modified food-like stuff), mindfully, when we’re hungry, in moderation. I think the worry, the self-denying, the strict adherence to dietary “rules” that seem to change weekly cause more toxicity in our bodies than a well-marbled, 3-oz. grass-fed steak. If you want the cookie, eat the damn cookie. Just don’t eat the whole dozen. …or if you DO eat the whole dozen (guilty!), don’t do it all the time (that’s the “moderation in moderation” part).

I had a conversation recently about the healthfulness of farro. We had overindulged during the holidays and were talking about “cleansing” to help our sluggish-feeling systems reset. I mentioned making a farro salad for lunch. She looked at me as if I had just said I was going to eat nothing but Twinkies for a week. “That’s not cleansing – don’t you know farro contains (the ominous and deadly) g..g..g..gluten!!!” Obviously, our ideas of “cleansing” are different. Gluten is not my enemy.

Farro is a nutritious whole grain. It’s an excellent source of protein, fiber and nutrients, and contains a variety of antioxidants like polyphenols, carotenoids, phytosterols and selenium. Add some fiber and vitamin-C rich pomegranate seeds and hunger-satiating fat with almonds and olive oil. Satisfy the splurge factor with a bit of bacon and feta and…voile, a toothsome grain salad.

Whether you consider this a healthy meal or death on a plate is determined by what camp you sit it. I hope we can all agree, at least, that this Farro and Pomegranate Salad is damn tasty. Mmmm…

p.s. I love the pop of the pomegranate seeds in my mouth when I eat this salad!


Farro and Pomegranate Salad

Chewy farro flecked with pomegranate seeds, feta, bacon and almonds makes a colorful and hearty main-course salad. The salty-tart flavor of preserved lemons adds a unique twist.


Ingredients

  • 2 cups cooked farro, cooled
  • 2 cups pomegranate seeds
  • ¾ cup crumbled feta cheese
  • ½ cup cilantro, roughly chopped
  • ⅓ cup toasted almonds (or pistachios), roughly chopped
  • 3 Tablespoons chopped preserved lemons
  • 3 Tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • ¼ cup good-quality olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • 3 strips crisp bacon, crumbled

Directions

  1. In a bowl, combine farro, pomegranate seeds, feta, cilantro, almonds, and preserved lemon. Drizzle with vinegar and olive oil and mix well. Season to taste with salt and pepper (you may not need salt due to the salty feta and lemon). Add bacon just before serving so it remains crisp.

Fromage Fort

Fromage fort – a fabulously thrifty and tasty French solution for repurposing all those nubs of leftover cheese.

a bowl of fromage fort with chips
Giving credit where it’s due, this was my sister S’s suggestion – not her recipe, but her idea. On Boxing Day, I was grumbling about a refrigerator full of holiday leftovers, including the six different cheeses rapidly aging in the cheese drawer. What was I going to do with six nubs of various cheese before they went bad?

That’s when she mentioned fromage fort. Fromage fort is a French cheese spread, literally meaning “strong cheese,” that’s made by blending together various pieces of leftover cheese, a bit of leftover white wine, garlic, and herbs. There’s a dozen of recipes out there – Pépin, Smitten Kitchen, Alton Brown, David Lebovitz, Sauver – all very similar, all very adaptable, because the idea is to use whatever leftovers you have on hand, making this thrifty French solution for too much cheese more spectacular than the sum of its parts. I recommend steering clear of very strong cheese, like blue cheese, which will overwhelm all other flavors in the final dip.

Oh, and there’s a German version, too – mixed with beer (of course!) – called Obatzda.


Fromage Fort

  • Servings: about 2 cups
  • Print

A fabulously thrifty and tasty French solution for repurposing all those nubs of leftover cheese.


Ingredients

  • 8 oz. mixed leftover cheeses (hard cheese grated, soft cheese cubed)
  • 3 Tablespoons full-fat ricotta, or 2 Tablespoons softened butter (if you don’t have ricotta on hand)
  • 1 small garlic clove, minced
  • ¼- ⅓ cup white wine
  • 1 Tablespoon chopped thyme
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions

  1. In the bowl of a food processor, blend cheese, ricotta (or butter) and garlic until well-blended.
  2. Slowly pour in wine with motor running until the desired consistency – I prefer a scoopable, yet slightly chunk spread. Add thyme and pepper and pulse until combined. Fromage fort can be used immediately, allowed to ripen for up to 5 days, or spread on bread and toasted in the oven.

Cherry Apricot Sweet Buns

a tray of glazed and sugared sweet buns

I started the holiday season believing I could stick to a semi-healthful diet through December. Sure, I would indulge now and again – a favorite cookie here, a slice of panettone there, but overall keeping a plant based, lean meat, whole grain diet through to 2019. Oh, chimerical intentions!

Now that I’m staring at the back of Christmas, I’m ready to renew (albeit temporarily) my commitment to healthy-ish eating except…my kitchen is stuffed with leftovers from an overindulgent holiday celebration – duck-fat roasted potatoes (mmm…), cartons of whipping cream, half-used packages of dried fruits, nuts, and chocolate, no less than six types of cheese, and a freezer full of glazed, yeasted holiday breads like these cherry apricot sweet buns.

Maybe healthy eating can hold until February?


Cherry Apricot Sweet Buns

Fluffy, slightly sweet buns studded with mixed fruit.


Ingredients

  • ⅓ cup dried cherries, chopped
  • ⅓ cup dried apricots, chopped
  • ¼ cup dried figs, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon orange zest
  • 2 Tablespoons brandy
  • ¾ cup whole milk
  • 2 Tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cardamom
  • ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • Decorator or pearl sugar
  • Confectioner’s sugar icing

Directions

  1. In a small bowl, combine cherries, apricots, figs, zest and brandy and set aside to allow flavors to meld.
  2. In a small saucepan, heat the milk and sugar until warm (105⁰ – 110⁰ F). Sprinkle the yeast over the milk and let rest for 5 minutes. Meanwhile, combine flour, salt, cardamom, and nutmeg in the bowl of a mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment.
  3. Add the butter and vanilla to milk mixture (it should be foamy by now) and then mix into the flour to create a shaggy dough. Let dough rest for 15 minutes.
  4. Knead dough using the dough hook until smooth and elastic, about 12 minutes. Transfer the dough to a bowl, cover with plastic wrap and leave to proof in a warm spot until doubled in size, about one hour.
  5. Drain the fruit, if needed, and mix into dough. Divide the dough into 9 even pieces, roll into round balls, picking off any fruit on the outside that is exposed, and place the buns on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Cover with plastic wrap and proof again until risen, about one hour.
  6. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Brush the buns with beaten egg and liberally sprinkled with decorator sugar. Bake for 17-22 minutes until buns are dark golden brown and sound hollow when tapped on the bottom. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. Once cooled, drizzle with confectioner’s sugar icing.

Recipe Favorites of 2018

2018 has reached its end, bestowing on me the obligatory occasion to count blessings and recall the preceding year. One of the (numerous) difficulties I grapple with as a food blogger is that once I’ve finalized a recipe and posted it, I forget about it…forever…even when its success merits remaking. So, as 2018 dwindles to its last few days, I’m looking back on the past twelve months and summoning up the best dishes from this year’s posts – the ones I ought to remember so I can make them again, soon – and often. Here are my top 5, in no particular order:

Viennese Whirls

Raspberry-Rose Viennese Whirls – As pretty as they are delicious, these delicate Raspberry-Rose Viennese Whirls are Love made edible.

a bowl of Spanish Chorizo and Kale Soup

Spanish Chorizo and Kale Soup – a winter soup with a spicy, smoky Spanish twist thanks to chorizo and smoked paprika. Loads of dark green kale pack this flavorful soup with plenty of healthy goodness.

Compost Cookies

Best Compost Cookies – All you favorite cookie flavors – plus some surprises like coffee grounds.  These were a huge hit at the office.

Moist Banana Cherry Muffins

Banana Cherry Muffins – These exceptionally moist and flavorful muffins were adapted from my favorite banana bread recipe. I’m going to whip up a batch of these this weekend!

A pink grapefruit tart with whipped cream and shaved white chocolate

Refreshing Pink Grapefruit Tart – Pink grapefruit transforms a dessert standard into a flavor combination that’s surprising, yet familiar. A press-in crust keeps the fuss-factor down.  Another big hit in the office – and with the neighbors.